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Life-changing magic of tidying up: Complex structures' organization studied in slime mold

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
Researchers in Japan think they have found an answer to the fundamental biological question of how individual cells know which way to position themselves within a complex, multicellular body. Depending on a cell's purpose in the larger structure, contact or diffuse chemical signals direct it to its final destination.

Putting data privacy in the hands of users

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
MIT and Harvard University researchers have developed Riverbed, a platform that ensures web and mobile apps using distributed computing in data centers adhere to users' preferences on how their data are shared and stored in the cloud.

Thermally-painted metasurfaces yield perfect light absorbers for high-tech applications

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
Researchers from Case Western Reserve University in Ohio report their insights into how colors are generated on heated metal surfaces and apply those findings to create a nickel thin-film that perfectly absorbs red light.

Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia -- one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen using this energy source.

Russian researchers made gold nano-stars for intracellular delivery

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
Researchers from Russian Academy of Sciences developed a new method for star-shaped nanoparticles synthesis based on laser irradiation. A wide range of customizable conditions provides an opportunity to create comfortable environment for various substances delivery to different types of cells. The results are published in Journal of Biophotonics. The research was supported by the Russian Science Foundation.

EEG helps scientists predict epileptic seizures minutes in advance

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
Study shows that acetate, an acid found in some foods, may help doctors intervene when seizures are imminent.

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Wutip organizing

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
Tropical Depression 02W has organized and strengthened into a tropical storm.

New insight on potent HIV antibody could improve vaccine design

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
A new observation, led by researchers at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute, highlights the importance of previously unstudied mutations that arises early in bnAbs, giving the antibodies the flexibility to adapt to changes in the virus's outer envelope protein structure. This flexibility enables the antibody to dock on diverse strains of the virus and more potently neutralize them.

Salt could be a key factor in allergic immune reactions

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
Salt apparently affects allergic immune reactions. A team working with Professor Christina Zielinski at the Technical University of Munich has demonstrated in cell cultures that salt leads to the formation of Th2 cells. These immune cells are active in allergic conditions such as atopic dermatitis. The team also detected elevated salt concentrations in the skin of patients.

NASA-NOAA satellite looks at large-eyed Tropical Cyclone Oma

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
Tropical Cyclone Oma is a large hurricane with a big eye. The storm appeared well-organized on satellite imagery as it moved through the Southern Pacific Ocean.

Advances in naturopathy research reported in new special issue of JACM

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
Naturopathy, or 'naturopathic medicine' as the profession is branded in the United States, is a rapidly growing profession and scientifically advancing form of practice that can have a positive impact on a wide variety of chronic and complex conditions.

Vigorous exercise, fasting, hormones improve elimination of toxic, misfolded, unnecessary proteins in mouse and human cells

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
A new study shows vigorous exercise and fasting improve the ability of human and mouse cells to remove misfolded, toxic, unnecessary proteins. The findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism that activates the cells' protein-disposal machinery, allowing them to adapt their protein content to shifting demands and new conditions.

Researchers find genetic clues to high rates of asthma in those of African ancestry

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
In the largest study of its kind, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found new clues into the parts of the human genome associated with the higher rates of asthma in those of African ancestry.

Ingredients for water could be made on surface of moon, a chemical factory

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
When a stream of charged particles known as the solar wind careens onto the moon's surface at 450 kilometers per second (or nearly 1 million miles per hour), they enrich the moon's surface in ingredients that could make water, NASA scientists have found.

Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon around Arctic

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon collected at five sites around the Arctic, which has implications for global warming, according to a study by an international group of scientists that included a US team from Baylor University.

Nitisinone increases melanin in people with albinism

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
A small pilot clinical study at the National Eye Institute (NEI) suggests that the drug nitisinone increases melanin production in some people with oculocutaneous albinism type 1B (OCA-1B), a rare genetic disease that causes pale skin and hair and poor vision. Increased melanin could help protect people with the condition against the sun's UV rays and promote the development of normal vision.

Mandarin Chinese could help us understand how infants learn English

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
Infants may be more sensitive to non-native speech sounds than previously thought, according to a study published in the Journal of Memory and Language. The findings shed light on the way babies begin to understand language.

Viruses that linger in the gut could trigger type 1 diabetes

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
Researchers at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, provide new evidence supporting an association between elevated levels of enteroviruses in the intestinal tracts of children and islet autoimmunity, a precursor to type 1 diabetes. The paper appears in the journal Scientific Reports.

A volcanic binge and its frosty hangover

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
A major volcanic event could have triggered one of the largest glaciations in Earth's history -- the Gaskiers glaciation, which turned the Earth into a giant snowball approximately 580 million years ago. Researchers from Heidelberg University and colleagues from Mexico have discovered remnants of such a large igneous province that resulted from vast lava flows.

New therapeutic approach to combat African sleeping sickness

Wednesday February 20th, 2019 05:00:00 AM
Scientists working in a range of disciplines joined forces to identify a new approach to combat African sleeping sickness. Fundamental research undertaken under the supervision of Professor Ute Hellmich of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has revealed a promising strategy to develop a suitable agent.


 

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Last updated December 24, 2018