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Low mobility predicts hospital readmission in older heart attack patients

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
Close to 20% of elderly adults who have suffered a heart attack will be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days. Performance on a simple mobility test is the best predictor of whether an elderly heart attack patient will be readmitted, a Yale-led study reports.

Water walking -- The new mode of rock skipping

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
Utah State University's Splash Lab not only reveals the physics of how elastic spheres interact with water, but it also lays the foundation for the future design of water-walking drones.

Seven seconds of Spiderman viewing yields a 20% phobia symptom reduction

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
As the Marvel Avenger Endgame premieres in movie theaters this week, researchers have published a new article in Frontiers in Psychology which reveals that exposure to Spiderman and Antman movie excerpts decreases symptoms of spider and ant phobias, respectively.

Controlling instabilities gives closer look at chemistry from hypersonic vehicles

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
While studying the chemical reactions that occur in the flow of gases around a vehicle moving at hypersonic speeds, researchers at the University of Illinois used a less-is-more method to gain greater understanding of the role of chemical reactions in modifying unsteady flows that occur in the hypersonic flow around a double-wedge shape.

Fixing a broken heart: Exploring new ways to heal damage after a heart attack

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
The days immediately following a heart attack are critical for survivors' longevity and long-term healing of tissue. Now researchers at Northwestern University and University of California, San Diego have designed a method to deliver a regenerative material through a noninvasive catheter to the affected area of the heart. Once there, the body's inflammatory response signals the peptides to form nanofibers similar to the body's extracellular matrix, which degrades following a heart attack. This preclinical research was conducted in a rodent model.

Information technology can support antimicrobial stewardship programs

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
The incorporation of information technology (IT) into an antimicrobial stewardship program can help improve efficiency of the interventions and facilitate tracking and reporting of key metrics.

New way to 'see' objects accelerates the future of self-driving cars

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
Researchers have discovered a simple, cost-effective, and accurate new method for equipping self-driving cars with the tools needed to perceive 3D objects in their path.

Experiences of 'ultimate reality' or 'God' confer lasting benefits to mental health

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
In a survey of thousands of people who reported having experienced personal encounters with God, Johns Hopkins researchers report that more than two-thirds of self-identified atheists shed that label after their encounter, regardless of whether it was spontaneous or while taking a psychedelic.

New sensor detects rare metals used in smartphones

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
A more efficient and cost-effective way to detect lanthanides, the rare earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies, could be possible with a new protein-based sensor that changes its fluorescence when it binds to these metals.

Girls and boys on autism spectrum tell stories differently, could explain 'missed diagnosis' in girls

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
A new study from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) examined differences in the way girls and boys on the autism spectrum used certain types of words during storytelling. This study found that autistic girls used significantly more "cognitive process" words such as "think" and "know" than autistic boys, despite comparable autism symptom severity.

Carbon dioxide from Silicon Valley affects the chemistry of Monterey Bay

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
Elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide in air flowing out to sea from Silicon Valley and the Salinas Valley could increase the amount of carbon dioxide dissolving in Monterey Bay waters by about 20 percent.

When designing clinical trials for huntington's disease, first ask the experts

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
Progress in understanding the genetic mutation responsible for Huntington's disease (HD) and at least some molecular underpinnings of the disease has resulted in a new era of clinical testing of potential treatments. How best to design clinical trials in which HD patients are willing to participate and comply is a question faced by researchers.

Researchers devise a progression risk-based classification for patients with AWM

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
Researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have devised a risk model for determining whether patients with AWM have a low, intermediate, or high risk of developing symptomatic Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

Advances in cryo-EM materials may aid cancer and biomedical research

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
Cryogenic-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) has been a game changer in the field of medical research, but the substrate, used to freeze and view samples under a microscope, has not advanced much in decades. Now, thanks to a collaboration between Penn State researchers and the applied science company Protochips, Inc., this is no longer the case.

Feces transplantation: Effective treatment with economic benefits

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
From an average of 37 days in hospital to just 20 days per year. So pronounced is the decrease in hospitalizations for patients who are treated with feces transplantation instead of antibiotics to fight the deadly intestinal disease Clostridium difficile. This is shown by the first study using what is known as 'real world data.'

Study: Drugs reprogram genes in breast tumors to prevent endocrine resistance

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
Treating breast tumors with two cancer drugs simultaneously may prevent endocrine resistance by attacking the disease along two separate gene pathways, scientists at the University of Illinois found in a new study. The two drugs used in the study, selinexor and 4-OHT, caused the cancer cells to die and tumors to regress for prolonged periods.

When is sexting associated with psychological distress among young adults?

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
While sending or receiving nude electronic images may not always be associated with poorer mental health, being coerced to do so and receiving unwanted sexts was linked to a higher likelihood of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, according to a new study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

New Cochrane Review investigates the effectiveness of nicotine replacement therapy

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
New evidence published in the Cochrane Library provides high quality evidence that people who use a combination of nicotine replacement therapies (a patch plus a short acting form, such as gum or lozenge) are more likely to successfully quit smoking than people who use a single form of the medicine.

New diagnostic tool developed for global menace Xylella fastidiosa increases specificity

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
In a research article in Plant Disease, Bonants et al. record their efforts to improve the reliability of existing X. fastidiosa diagnostic tools. The team combined two existing tools with an internal control to develop a triplex TaqMan assay, which they then used to analyze DNA extracts in naturally infected plant material, artificially infected plant material, and uninfected plant material.

Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at risk of giving birth prematurely

Tuesday April 23rd, 2019 04:00:00 AM
Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of delivering their baby prematurely. The risk increases as blood sugar levels rise, however women who maintain the recommended levels also risk giving birth prematurely. These are the findings from researchers at Karolinska Institutet and the Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden, published in Annals of Internal Medicine.


 

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Last updated April 13, 2019