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One of the primary efforts at Dynamic Patterns Research is bringing to our readers interesting information and articles related to citizen science and amateur research through our DPR Journal as well as the latest in neurotechnology with Neuron News. These journals are considered to be news and original commentary logs, but are largely based on the curation of content from other sources.

Direct attribution is always provided in articles published by DPR either via direct linking to an article or by other descriptive hyperlink reference to an individual, organization, or program. Formal attribution systems for literary and scientific works in publications already exist, but there has been no clear, universal method to recognize and reference source materials of published articles (either professional or amateur) that are based on “discovery through the web.”

Curator's Code Logo

One of today’s top web curators, Maria Popova of Brain Pickings, recently helped to develop a new system to make attribution consistent and codified, while respecting those who expand upon others’ creative and intellectual work. This simple “Curator’s Code” system features two Unicode symbols to represent the class of attribution used by authors. The sideways ‘s’ symbol, , or “via” corresponds to a direct re-posting or reference to content discovered through another source and shared with an audience with minimal modification or amplification. The second symbol, a curving arrow, , or “hat tip” represents an indirect discovery from another source of an idea, but with significant elaboration when shared with an audience.

Dynamic Patterns Research will begin implementing this new system for curation attribution in future published articles as we strongly believe clear reference to the creative and intellectual efforts of others must be obvious in our published writings. However, the additional commentary, information, and original content provided by DPR should also be separated in a similarly clear and obvious way, and the Curator’s Code system simultaneously offers these needs in a straightforward way.

Learn more about the Curator’s Code and let us know what you think about the new system in the comments below.

 

 
Comet ISON on October 08, 2013

Comet ISON captured by the Mount Lemmon SkyCenter using the 0.8m Schulman Telescope and an STX-16803 CCD camera (via Wikipedia).

Comet ISON joins us this year from the Oort-cloud and is barreling toward the Sun for the very first time. The formal designation of the comet is C/2012 S1 representing a non-periodic (“C”) object discovered in “2012” in the second-half of September (“S”) and was the first comet discovered during that half-month (“1”). To help the name roll off the tongue a bit more smoothly, ISON represents where the discovery is officially attributed at the Russia-based International Scientific Optical Network.

Discovered last year during a series of observations between December 28, 2011 and into 2012 until its official announcement on September 24, 2012, Comet ISON has been watched closely since first being spotted between the orbits of Jupiter and Saturn. NASA’s many tools on active duty have had their go at Comet ISON including Deep Impact, Swift, Hubble, Spitzer, the Mars team, STEREO, Juno, MESSENGER, SOHO, as well as many ground-based observatories and amateur astronomers.

What will be ISON’s Fate?

Earlier in the year, Comet ISON was anticipated to be the comet of the century, but as it approaches closer to the Sun’s radiation, its fate is up for grabs. While many of us in the United States are filling our bellies with a bounty of goodness, November 28, 2013 will be the day that decides Comet ISON’s future. It might dwindle away to oblivion under the Sun’s forces — as is just now being reported at Spaceweather.com that astronomers in Spain are observing a change in the composition of the comet nucleus, possibly indicating that it is already breaking apart (read more). It might also break up into bits of comet as its nucleus becomes increasingly unstable, or — and what so many are hoping for — it will survive the fly by of the Sun and will emerge so bright that it will be observable on Earth during the daytime. 

If Comet ISON does survive, then the month of December will offer many opportunities before dawn to make your own observations in the Northern Hemisphere looking toward the East. The animated infographic below provides a visual daily map to help you point your binoculars in the right direction and witness a comet making its first pass through our solar system.

For more information, videos, and images check out NASA’s Comet ISON Watch

Comet ISON

 

 


 UPDATE: November 28, 2013 @ 11:58 pm CST

During many Thanksgiving Feasts today, and some of the ensuing surges of shopping around the country, Comet ISON completed its spin around the Sun. The initial reports and visuals appeared to suggest that the nucleus broke up and the out-gassing tail fizzed away. The following SOHO time-lapse image shows an incredible pass of Comet ISON and a definite reduction in the intensity of the tail:

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These images from NASA’s Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory show Comet ISON growing dim as it made the journey around the sun. The comet is believed to have broken up and evaporated.
Image Credit: NASA/SDO/ESA/SOHO/GSFC

However, the fate of Comet ISON might not be settled just yet. Scientists are frantically reviewing data to determine what is going on — apparently with the media breathing down their necks! — because there is a hint of a re-ignition for Comet ISON or some other celestial surprise that will certainly offer new insight and data into the amazing functioning of our Universe. New science is happening right now, sloshing through leftover turkey and microwaved mashed potatoes and gravy.

Read more about the latest confusions and hypothesis from scientists from Karl Battams’ blog post at The Planetary Society, “Schrödinger’s Comet.”

 

 

This evening just after sunset, the crescent Moon was positioned in a beautiful triangular alignment with Venus and Jupiter. (view the skymap) I took the kids out to try using the binoculars to see the Moon — which they certainly also just used to walk around the yard finding one another! — and to talk a little about the two planets and how cool it is that we can see them with our own eyes.

These slightly in-focus images were taken with a very simple Nikon CoolPix S8100 auto focus in night landscape mode on a tripod.