Powerful new science and technological advances are a hallmark of the human species. We have been watching and interacting as new advancements happen in real-time for decades. One of the most memorable moments was when the entire county was glued to television sets in 1969 watching the first human being step directly onto our Moon.

So, although this mass participation of witnessing new science as it happens is not a new experience, Dynamic Patterns Research has been experimenting with “live” commentary and interactions with our users through the social interface of Facebook. Earlier this year, we watched as the Mars Curiosity Rover landed on the Red Planet (read more), and on the day of the event, we hosted a live Facebook comment feed (view). We also created a photo review of live screen shots during the event to commemorate the historic moment:

Today, Dynamic Patterns Research took part in witnessing another important event in human technological achievements: the Red Bull Stratos Mission that sent a human being into the statosphere over 120,000 feet (23 miles) above sea level.

This brave human was Felix Baumgartner and he jumped out of a capsule in a custom fitted pressurized suit to free-fall reaching speeds above the sound barrier… the fastest human being — without a propelling system — ever. The interactive Mission Timeline provides an exciting, and awe-inspiring review of the stages of the flight.

Read the Facebook live comment feed during the Red Bull Stratos Mission

During the live feed event, we took screen shots to document some of the most exciting moments of the flight. With only one glitch of Felix’s helmet potentially not maintaining adequate heat, the entire operation appeared to proceed smoothly. Jumping from around 128,000 feet, you could almost feel the tension across the Internet from everyone watching the live feed together. It was incredible to see a man leap out of a tiny capsule so far above the planet.

 

More details about this wild and historic jump will be made available after the Red Bull Stratos team analyzes the valuable data collected through the jump. They’ll review what speed he reached, how his body handled the experience, and if similar approaches will be viable for offering safe emergency procedures for astronauts and space tourists of the future.

Watching these technological advancements happen live certainly isn’t citizen science in and of itself. However, the experience is an interesting opportunity for actively reaching out to support another fundamental goal of Dynamic Patterns Research: to bring a greater appreciation for science and a deeper understanding for how the Universe works to a broader public. We believe that everyone doesn’t need to earn a Ph.D. in a scientific field, but it is important that more citizens have a broader and greater appreciation for basic scientific ideas. We make decisions every day from local events in our personal lives to larger considerations that include national political and policy ideas. It’s important that we do not take for granted what we are told from the media and the political leaders of our country, and that we are able to critically evaluate what is happening around us on a daily basis.

Experiencing inspirational scientific events and participating in accessible scientific activities can provide great informal educational opportunities for the public. These experiences will increase our appreciation for the Universe, which is vital for our continued exponentially increasing rate of human advancement.

If you are would like to participate in a future live feed scientific event, become a fan of the Dynamic Patterns Research Facebook page to be notified or subscribe to our mailing list. If you are aware of an upcoming event that DPR should be aware of, please contact us right away.

 
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Last updated December 5, 2014