On Sunday, May 20, 2012, the Moon passed directly in front of the Sun offering a memorable view of an annular solar eclipse from southeast Asia into the western United States.

Path of Annular Solar Eclipse May 20, 2012 - Wolfram Alpha

Path of Annular Solar Eclipse May 20, 2012 - Wolfram Alpha

Here in Central Illinois, Dynamic Patterns Research was unable to witness the solar eclipse thanks to several nice pockets of severe thunderstorms, although we should have been able to see a sliver of eclipse just above the horizon at sunset. Fortunately, many others around the country did have memorable experiences with this special event with great photographs and informal educational experiences with their children. If you would like to re-live the full experience from your home computer, the team at CosmoQuest from SIUE provided a live three-and-one-half-hour feed with commentary and video covering the entire event:

The digital social world was filled with sharing of solar eclipse images, some quite aesthetically outstanding and awe-inspiring. Check out the album from Space.com and the album from Spaceweather.com to witness this great natural wonder of our solar system by talented citizen scientists and enthusiasts from all over the world.

Certainly, a solar eclipse can inspire adults into a greater appreciation of this wonderful universe, but an event like a solar eclipse can offer something a little more special to children. I seem to recall many years ago (well, not that many) during my pre-school days playing outside in the playground when the world grew a little darker and the teachers thoroughly reminded us to not look directly at the sun. The memory is mostly a haze, but I almost think I was a bit scared. Maybe I didn’t understand what was going on, or I was just afraid that I might go blind. What I didn’t have back then was a guided informal educational experience that I was certainly primed and ready for. Moments like these are brief, but critical, for exciting and intriguing young brains about science and helping them develop an appreciation for how everything around us works.

The Geesamans testing their home-made viewer before the eclipse - May 20, 2012Kate Cormeny Geesaman spent the afternoon experimenting with her children building a solar eclipse viewer and then giving it a try at their home in south-central Texas. 

“I think I may have seen a slight sliver “on” the sun, but it wasn’t the dramatic viewing I had imagined. But, Aaron was introduced to the idea and we had a great time in the beautiful Texas weather with our family and neighbors! After we went inside we got our SkyMap app open on our phone and observed how the moon was indeed in front of the sun…just below the horizon.”

Kate Geesaman and son observing the solar eclipse - May 20, 2012

Although Kate and her children were unsuccessful in creating a clear observable image of the eclipse, the experience was certainly invaluable for bringing a bit more curiosity to her young boys, and teaching them something about how to create tools to solve problems — an evolutionary essence of being a human. And, spending time with family, friends, and science makes for a perfect Sunday afternoon!

If you have any images that you would like to share, please post to the Dynamic Patterns Research Facebook page and we’ll be sure to feature your work to everyone.

Unfortunately, Dynamic Patterns Research missed out on making our own direct observations of the annular solar eclipse, but the next opportunity will be perfect, weather permitting of course. We’ve already set our calendars for Monday, August 21, 2017 when the path of the eclipse will be nearly directly overhead, so a “ring-of-fire” image should be possible.

The next annular solar eclipse over the United States, Monday, August 21, 2017 - Wolfram Alpha

The next annular solar eclipse over the United States, Monday, August 21, 2017 - Wolfram Alpha

Be sure to “Like” our Facebook page and subscribe to DPR to be the first to see our images of the eclipse in 2017!

 

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Last updated August 20, 2018